Select Page

Reply To: Absent Membership

Forum Home Forums Horizon Project – Have your say! Absent Membership Reply To: Absent Membership

#57870
Sam B
Member

I agree that it is unfair to increase the costs of absent membership and to change the requirements. There are many, who – for whatever circumstances – are unable to visit the club for a period of their lives. Unlike a gym or other service, it is not possible to pause or give up membership and then rejoin, which means those people effectively pay for the privilege of rejoining at a later point.

I personally would be in favour of allowing people to “pause” their membership for whatever reason they choose, for a modest annual fee (say 10% of whatever the usual cost would be), but they would not be members during that time and not be entitled to visit the Club.

Of the various options for taking up this option, the most obvious would be moving abroad, but there would be others – e.g. student members who spent 1/2 the year or more far from the club and for whom the cost is otherwise a real burden; those who for whatever reason have had to move out of London (or to the other side of London) making regular visits difficult …

Currently the fact that the one cannot rejoin the club, due to the waiting list (or lack thereof), means those who (for whatever reason) are unable to visit the club regularly pay a steep price for retaining membership for some point in the future.

If the Club needs to raise income, I would prefer to see it do that in other ways, e.g. increase the joining fee for new members who are not children of current members. If overcrowding is sought to be an issue, then we need simply to reduce the number of members, which will happen naturally over a 10-15 year period, i.e. simply not let in new people until there is thought to be space. Another solution would be to look at reciprocal club rights – I know that many visitors to the club are in fact reciprocal members (e.g. of overseas clubs or of other London clubs such as the East India). I would cut back on such reciprocal rights.